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25th May 2014

Photo reblogged from $$$ with 22,962 notes

afroamericanpsycho:

creolecontradiction:

creolecontradiction:

Hands down this was the most powerful pic I took yesterday as 712 proud young men and women walked across the stage at Clark Atlanta University with a Bachelor’s, Master’s and Doctorate Degrees. In which 99% were “minorities” and 40 % being first generation College graduates!! #success #HBCUPride

Just gonna repost this image again. It needs to be seen all over tumblr.

black excellence

afroamericanpsycho:

creolecontradiction:

creolecontradiction:

Hands down this was the most powerful pic I took yesterday as 712 proud young men and women walked across the stage at Clark Atlanta University with a Bachelor’s, Master’s and Doctorate Degrees. In which 99% were “minorities” and 40 % being first generation College graduates!! #success #HBCUPride

Just gonna repost this image again. It needs to be seen all over tumblr.

black excellence

Source: creolecontradiction

25th May 2013

Photo reblogged from The Educated Field Negro with 86,483 notes

theeducatedfieldnegro:

Me
me
me

i swear this is me at this very moment… smh.

theeducatedfieldnegro:

Me

me

me

i swear this is me at this very moment… smh.

Source: kittiezandtittiez

13th July 2012

Photo reblogged from Stay Positive - Inspiring Quotes with 19,365 notes

12th July 2012

Photo reblogged from Stay Positive - Inspiring Quotes with 4,700 notes

4th July 2012

Photo reblogged from Stay Positive - Inspiring Quotes with 9,373 notes

27th June 2012

Photo reblogged from stay gold with 358,177 notes

Source: y0uinspiredme

23rd April 2012

Photo reblogged from i can read with 13,415 notes

22nd April 2012

Photo reblogged from Ursa Major; The Great Bear with 883 notes

so-treu:

inspirationcocoa:

I’m reblogging this photo because I just read this article about how people should subscribe to HBO so GIrls will stay on the air and we will have more shows about women written by women and here is my response: 

I’ve been thinking about it a lot lately and it seems like every time they say, “yay for women-helmed shows!” They mean white women. I don’t see Jez or really anyone talking about how we should all support Scandal because it’s written by a Black woman, starring a Black woman and based on a real political strategist who is also a Black woman. That’s f*cking groundbreaking.

And it is. 

you mean black women are WOMEN??????????????????

so-treu:

inspirationcocoa:

I’m reblogging this photo because I just read this article about how people should subscribe to HBO so GIrls will stay on the air and we will have more shows about women written by women and here is my response: 

I’ve been thinking about it a lot lately and it seems like every time they say, “yay for women-helmed shows!” They mean white women. I don’t see Jez or really anyone talking about how we should all support Scandal because it’s written by a Black woman, starring a Black woman and based on a real political strategist who is also a Black woman. That’s f*cking groundbreaking.

And it is. 

you mean black women are WOMEN??????????????????

Source: inspirationcocoa

10th March 2012

Link reblogged from The Educated Field Negro with 452 notes

13-Year-Old Jada Williams persecuted over her essay on Frederick Douglass →

black-culture:

 Jada Williams, a 13-year old student in Rochester, New York, wrote an essay comparing and contrasting her school experience in 2012 to the educational challenges described in “The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass“.

On Saturday, February 18, 2012, theFrederick Douglass Foundation of New York presented the first Spirit of Freedom award to Jada Williams, a 13-year old city of Rochester student.  Miss Williams wrote an essay on her impressions of Frederick Douglass’ first autobiography the Narrative of the Life This was part of an essay contest, but her essay was never entered.  It offended her teachers so much that, after harassment from teachers and school administrators at School #3, Miss Williams was forced to leave the school.

We at the Frederick Douglass Foundation honored her because her essay actually demonstrates that she understood the autobiography, even though it might seem a bit esoteric to most 13-year olds.  In her essay, she quotes part of the scene where Douglass’ slave master catches his wife teaching then slave Frederick to read.  During a speech about how he would be useless as a slave if he were able to read, Mr. Auld, the slave master, castigated his wife.

Miss Williams quoted Douglass quoting Mr. Auld:  “If you teach that nigger (speaking of myself) how to read, there will be no keeping him. It will forever unfit him to be a slave. He would at once become unmanageable, and of no value to his master.”

Miss Williams personalized this to her own situation.  She reflected on how the “white teachers” do not have enough control of the classroom to successfully teach the minority students in Rochester.  While she herself is more literate than most, due to her own perseverance and diligence, she sees the fact that so many of the other “so-called ‘unteachable’” students aren’t learning to read as a form of modern-day slavery.  Their illiteracy holds them back in society.

Her call to action was then in her summary: “A grand price was paid in order for us to be where we are today; but in my mind we should be a lot further, so again I encourage the white teachers to instruct and I encourage my people to not just be a student, but become a learner.”

This offended her English teacher so much that the teacher copied the essay for other teachers and for the Principal. After that, Miss Williams’ mother and father started receiving phone calls from numerous teachers, all claiming that their daughter is “angry.”  Miss Williams, mostly a straight-A student, started receiving very low grades, and she was kicked out of class for laughing and threatened with in-school suspension.

There were several meetings with teachers and administrators, but all failed to answer Miss Williams’ mother’s questions. The teachers refused to show her the tests and work that she had supposedly performed so poorly on.  Instead, the teachers and administrators branded her a problem.

Unable to take anymore of the persecution, they pulled her from School #3.  Wanting to try another school, they were quickly informed that that school was filled and told to try “this school.”  During her first day at this new school, she witnessed four fights, and other students asked her if she was put here because she fights too much.

Long story short, they took an exceptional student, with the radical idea that kids should learn to read, and put her in a school of throwaway students who are even more unmanageable than the average student in her previous school.  To protect their daughter, her parents have had to remove her from school, and her mother has had to quit her job so she can take care of Miss Williams.

To date, the administrators of School #3 have refused to release her records, even though she no longer attends the school, and they have repeatedly given her mother the run around.  We at theFrederick Douglass Foundation have contacted school administrators in regards to this situation and have also been told to hit the pavement.

That’s what we intend to do.  If this school will sacrifice the welfare of an above-average student whose essay, that they asked her to write, they find offensive, we intend to make everyone aware of this monstrous injustice.  The school has a job, and it is not doing it.

We would like as many folks as possible to call the Principal of School #3 and complain about this injustice.  Her name is Miss Connie Wehner, and she can be reached at (585) 454-3525. This treatment of Jada Williams cannot stand.

What say you? Start by making the call!

Source: black-culture

26th January 2012

Video reblogged from FYeahKellyRowland with 128 notes

Kelly Rowland - "Keep It Between Us" from Kelly Rowland on Vimeo.

fyeahkellyrowland:

KEEP IT BETWEEN US.

love this.